[Geowanking] National Science Foundation Visualization Challenge

R E Sieber resieber at gmail.com
Fri Jun 13 11:38:44 PDT 2008


Tell me about it. I'm currently developing a cyberinfrastructure for the 
humanities. No disrespect to the humanities but they don't know about 
computers. And it is a constant battle to get access.

Renee

Eric Wolf wrote:
> You miss my point - it's not that the NSF reviewers lack appropriate 
> rights - it's that researchers outside of schools of engineering and 
> departments of computer science frequently fight battles with IT 
> security that can cause things not to work smoothly. I've experienced 
> it many times.
>
> I know it's hard to believe. I'm constantly dumb-founded by the inane 
> hurdles I have to go through in order to just do my work. I spent over 
> a decade in the private sector developing software. This is the kind 
> of problem that usually resolved in seconds outside of academia. 
> However, inside academia it's a constant battle. And just when you 
> thought you had everything working, someone changes policies and your 
> demo doesn't work.
>
> But as I think more about it, the real reason the NSF is asking for 
> stand-alone HTML is to provide a blind review process.
>
> -Eric
>
> On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 12:13 PM, Randy George <rkgeorge at cadmaps.com 
> <mailto:rkgeorge at cadmaps.com>> wrote:
>
>     Hi Eric,
>
>      
>
>     But… isn't that a compelling reason to just provide a link?
>
>      
>
>     The review committee only needs a  highspeed link, a computer with
>     a sufficiently modern GPU, and a decent projector. All the
>     installation is out of their hands. The link points at an SGI or
>     Deep Blue or whatever AWS Hadoop, Beowulf  cluster … needed at the
>     other end, no admin rights required.
>
>      
>
>     randy
>
>      
>
>     *From:* geowanking-bounces at lists.burri.to
>     <mailto:geowanking-bounces at lists.burri.to>
>     [mailto:geowanking-bounces at lists.burri.to
>     <mailto:geowanking-bounces at lists.burri.to>] *On Behalf Of *Eric Wolf
>     *Sent:* Friday, June 13, 2008 11:00 AM
>
>     *To:* geowanking at lists.burri.to <mailto:geowanking at lists.burri.to>
>     *Subject:* Re: [Geowanking] National Science Foundation
>     Visualization Challenge
>
>      
>
>     One of the reasons for the limitations is to ensure that the
>     content can be judged - but not because NSF lacks the facilities.
>     If you've ever tried to say, get a development server set up in an
>     academic environment outside of an engineering school or CompSci
>     department, you'd know the challenges.
>
>     I'm currently dealing with this problem in my work. I'm supposed
>     to be exploring ways to contribute to OGC specs on behalf of The
>     National Map. To do this, I want to make code changes to servers
>     and clients that implement OGC - like GeoServer and OpenLayers.
>     But I'm not allowed to have admin or root access on my workstation.
>
>     Another possible reason is that NSF usually tries to use a blind
>     review process. If they have to point a browser to your website,
>     they know who created it.
>
>     -Eric Wolf
>
>     On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 10:49 AM, Randy George
>     <rkgeorge at cadmaps.com <mailto:rkgeorge at cadmaps.com>> wrote:
>
>     Hi Renee,
>
>     Curious, I took a look at the NSF link. I would have guessed
>     "interactive
>     graphics" would fit geowanking more than "info graphics." I think
>     you are
>     right, though, about the winning entries. I wonder if it has
>     something to do
>     with NSF's limitations.
>
>     For example here is the acceptable formats list for media:
>       "Interactive and Non-interactive Media:
>            Preferred animation formats: NTSC Beta SP, DVC Pro.
>            Digital formats such as QuickTime, Flash, AVI or MPEG are
>     acceptable.
>            Digital files should be copied to CD-ROM(s) or DVD."
>
>     Or this:
>            "Q: May we use an online URL as an entry?
>            A: No. We can't rely on Internet connections during the
>     review/judging process. Save the relevant html and any associated
>     media
>     locally and then burn it to a CD-ROM or DVD."
>
>     Hmm ... Is this "Visualization Challenge" or challenged
>     visualization? I
>     thought interactive media would include internet, browser, portal,
>     online
>     communities, virtual 3D worlds, OGC WPS pipes etc. I somehow doubt
>     it can
>     fit on a cd-rom or dvd. What is HTML without httpd? Perhaps NSF
>     could rent a
>     more up-to-date venue for their review process with a reliable
>     highspeed
>     connection.
>
>     The judges appear stuck in an earlier media generation. Perhaps a
>     case of
>     Kuhn meets McLuhan? If NSF wants to stimulate innovation they should
>     consider moving 'media' ahead a decade or two.
>
>     randy
>
>     -----Original Message-----
>     From: geowanking-bounces at lists.burri.to
>     <mailto:geowanking-bounces at lists.burri.to>
>     [mailto:geowanking-bounces at lists.burri.to
>     <mailto:geowanking-bounces at lists.burri.to>] On Behalf Of R E Sieber
>     Sent: Thursday, June 12, 2008 1:32 PM
>     To: geowanking at lists.burri.to <mailto:geowanking at lists.burri.to>
>     Subject: [Geowanking] National Science Foundation Visualization
>     Challenge
>
>     This may be of interest to some.
>
>     Science and engineering visualization challenge (National Science
>     Foundation)
>     http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/scivis/index.jsp?id=challenge
>
>     Frankly, I find their winning entries uninspiring in terms of new
>     technologies (e..g, look at their FAQs, which are incredibly snarky).
>     However, winning in one of these categories -- I'm guessing the info
>     graphics one would be right for geowankers -- would look very good on
>     one's resume.
>
>     BTW, it is open to international entries.
>
>     Renee
>
>     Some of science's most powerful statements are not made in words. From
>     the diagrams of DaVinci to Hooke's microscopic bestiary, the beaks of
>     Darwin's finches, Rosalind Franklin's x-rays or the latest
>     photographic
>     marvels retrieved from the remotest galactic outback, visualization of
>     research has a long and literally illustrious history. To
>     illustrate is,
>     etymologically and actually, to enlighten.
>
>     You can do science without graphics. But it's very difficult to
>     communicate it in the absence of pictures. Indeed, some insights can
>     only be made widely comprehensible as images. How many people
>     would have
>     heard of fractal geometry or the double helix or solar flares or
>     synaptic morphology or the cosmic microwave background, if they
>     had been
>     described solely in words?
>
>     To the general public, whose support sustains the global research
>     enterprise, these and scores of other indispensable concepts exist
>     chiefly as images. They become part of the essential iconic
>     lexicon. And
>     they serve as a source of excitement and motivation for the next
>     generation of researchers.
>
>     The National Science Foundation (NSF) and Science created the Science
>     and Engineering Visualization Challenge to celebrate that grand
>     tradition-and to encourage its continued growth. In a world where
>     science literacy is dismayingly rare, illustrations provide the most
>     immediate and influential connection between scientists and other
>     citizens, and the best hope for nurturing popular interest.
>     Indeed, they
>     are now a necessity for public understanding of research developments:
>     In an increasingly graphics-oriented culture, where people acquire the
>     majority of their news from TV and the World Wide Web, a story
>     without a
>     vivid and intriguing image is often no story at all.
>
>     We urge you and your colleagues to contribute to the next competition
>     and to join us in congratulating the winners.
>
>     Judges appointed by the National Science Foundation and the journal
>     Science will select winners in each of five categories: photographs,
>     illustrations, informational graphics, interactive media and
>     non-interactive media. The winners will be published in a special
>     section of the Sept. 26, 2008 issue of the journal Science and Science
>     Online and on the NSF Web site. One of the winning entries will be on
>     the front cover of Science. In addition, each finalist will receive a
>     free, one-year print and on-line subscription to the journal
>     Science and
>     a certificate of appreciation.
>
>     Entries for 2008 are being solicited now. We urge all researchers and
>     science communicators to participate in this unique and inspiring
>     competition.
>     _______________________________________________
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>     Geowanking at lists.burri.to <mailto:Geowanking at lists.burri.to>
>     http://lists.burri.to/mailman/listinfo/geowanking
>
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>
>
>
>     -- 
>     -=--=---=----=----=---=--=-=--=---=----=---=--=-=-
>     Eric B. Wolf 720-209-6818
>     PhD Student CU-Boulder - Geography
>
>
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>
>
>
> -- 
> -=--=---=----=----=---=--=-=--=---=----=---=--=-=-
> Eric B. Wolf 720-209-6818
> PhD Student CU-Boulder - Geography
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
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